Leila Harris

Professor

About

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Geography with minor in Development Studies and Social Change, 2004, PhD

Biography

I am most interested in gender, inequality and justice in relation to environment and development (from a feminist political ecology perspective), as well as intersections of gender, citizenship, narrative and state building. Projects include: state-led developmental and environmental change in Turkey (with focus on gender and ethnicity); everyday water access, narrative and citizenship in Ghana and South Africa, First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.

Trained as a socio-cultural and political geographer, my work examines social, cultural and political-economic dimensions of environmental and resource issues, with focus on water politics and governance in developing contexts. My work has highlighted water politics, use, and access in the Middle East, particularly associated with large-scale transformations of the upper Tigris-Euphrates basin. This work has included a range of issues linked with Turkey’s GAP project, from gender and ethnic inequalities, to narratives of nature and state building in the Kurdish dominated southeastern region. Current research efforts include a comparative project on shifting scales and sites of water governance in urban sites of Cape Town, South Africa, and Accra, Ghana, with focus on themes of citizenship, narrative, and inequality. Another project involves analysis of socio-spatial difference and narrative as key dimensions of environmental politics and citizenship in contemporary Turkey (connecting expressions of environmental issues to broader debates related to postcolonialism, affect, green citizenship, and subjectivity). I am also participating in several large collaborative research projects, including:  the use of metagenomic technology for water quality testing (www.watergovernance.ca); water governance in the Angat basin in the Philippines (http://www.angatbasin.wordpress.com/); First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and a project on gender and water pricing in Canada (both funded through SSHRC’s Water Economics, Policy, and Governance Network and described on the website of the Program on Water Governance,www.watergovernance.ca ). A current paper project also considers gender, race, and class in relation to discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.  Prospective graduate students should refer to the website for my ‘lab’: Environment and Development: Gender, Equity and Sustainability Perspectives, www.edges.ubc.ca for more information on my work and that of my students.


Teaching


Research

Research

SSHRC Insight, “Experiences of Shifting Water Governance: Comparative Study of Water Access, Narrative, and Citizenship in Accra Ghana and Cape Town South Africa.” 2013-2016.
http://edges.sites.olt.ubc.ca/research/edges-comparative-water-governance-in-africa-research-project-cwgar/

Res’Eau, NSERC Grant, 2013-2018. Water Governance in BC small communities and First Nations, http://www.reseauwaternet.ca/

SSHRC Connection, Angat Basin (Philippines) Water Governance Project, 2012-2016.https://watergovernance.ca/projects/water-development/urbanizing-watersheds-angat-river/

SSHRC Connection, Water Economics, Policy and Governance Network,
http://www.brocku.ca/social-sciences/research/water-economics-policy-governance-network

SSHRC WEPGN, project on water governance and BC First Nations,
https://watergovernance.ca/projects/water-in-canada/water-quality-in-bc-first-nations-communities/


Publications

Selected Publications

Journal articles and editorials

Harris, L. (2020) Assessing States and Evaluating Publics: Perspectives on water service delivery and evolving state-society relations in Accra, Ghana and Cape Town, South Africa, Environment and Planning C 38: 2: 290-311 https://doi.org/10.1177/2399654419859365

Brisbois, B. W., Spiegel, J. M., & Harris, L.M. (2019). Health, environment and colonial legacies: Situating the science of pesticides, bananas and bodies in Ecuador. Social Science & Medicine, 239, 112529 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112529 [S, LH as 20% contributor]

Hommes, L., Boelens, R., Harris, L.M. and Gert Jan Veldwisch. (2019). Rural–urban water struggles: urbanizing hydrosocial territories and evolving connections, discourses and identities. Water International 44(2): 81-94. https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1583311 [LH as 25% contributor]

Hommes, L., Veldwisch, G.J., Harris, L.M. and Rutgerd Boelens. (2019). Evolving connections, discourses and identities in rural–urban water struggles, Water International 44(2): 243-253. [LH as 20% contributor] https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1583312

Torio, P.C., Harris, L.M. and Leonora C. Angeles. (2019). The rural–urban equity nexus of Metro Manila’s water system. Water International 44(2): 115-128. https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1560559 [S, LH as 20% contributor]

Campero, C., Harris, L.M (2019). The Legal Geographies of Water Claims: Seawater desalination in mining regions of Chile. Water 11 http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/w11050886 [PD, LH as 20 % contributor]

 

Books and edited collections

Harris, L., J. Goldin, C. Sneddon, eds. 2013. Contemporary Water Governance in the Global South: Scarcity, marketization, and participation. Edited Book.

 

Book chapters

Jepson, W., A. Wutich, L. Harris (2020). Water-Security Capabilities and the Human Right to Water. In F. Sultana and A. Loftus (eds) Human Right to Water: Politics, Struggles Routledge, Earthscan. (LH as 33% contributor)

Harris, L. (2020). Equity and Justice: water access in underserved areas of Accra Ghana. Access to Water in Africa: Towards New Paradigms Vulnerabilities, Exclusions, Resilience and New Solidarity. D. Blanchon and B. Casciarri Paris, France, University of Nanterre Press.

Harris, L. (2019). Equity and Justice: water access in underserved areas of Accra Ghana. Access to Water in Africa:
Towards New Paradigms Vulnerabilities, Exclusions, Resilience and New Solidarity. D. Blanchon and B. Casciarri Paris,
France, University of Nanterre Press.

 

Please refer to my IRES website for full list of publications and abstracts.


Additional Description

EDGES Research Collaborativehttp://www.edges.ubc.ca/

Dr. Leila Harris is most interested in gender, inequality and justice in relation to environment and development (from a feminist political ecology perspective), as well as intersections of gender, citizenship, narrative and state building. Projects include: state-led developmental and environmental change in Turkey (with focus on gender and ethnicity); everyday water access, narrative and and citizenship in Ghana and South Africa, First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.


Leila Harris

Professor

About

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Geography with minor in Development Studies and Social Change, 2004, PhD

Biography

I am most interested in gender, inequality and justice in relation to environment and development (from a feminist political ecology perspective), as well as intersections of gender, citizenship, narrative and state building. Projects include: state-led developmental and environmental change in Turkey (with focus on gender and ethnicity); everyday water access, narrative and citizenship in Ghana and South Africa, First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.

Trained as a socio-cultural and political geographer, my work examines social, cultural and political-economic dimensions of environmental and resource issues, with focus on water politics and governance in developing contexts. My work has highlighted water politics, use, and access in the Middle East, particularly associated with large-scale transformations of the upper Tigris-Euphrates basin. This work has included a range of issues linked with Turkey’s GAP project, from gender and ethnic inequalities, to narratives of nature and state building in the Kurdish dominated southeastern region. Current research efforts include a comparative project on shifting scales and sites of water governance in urban sites of Cape Town, South Africa, and Accra, Ghana, with focus on themes of citizenship, narrative, and inequality. Another project involves analysis of socio-spatial difference and narrative as key dimensions of environmental politics and citizenship in contemporary Turkey (connecting expressions of environmental issues to broader debates related to postcolonialism, affect, green citizenship, and subjectivity). I am also participating in several large collaborative research projects, including:  the use of metagenomic technology for water quality testing (www.watergovernance.ca); water governance in the Angat basin in the Philippines (http://www.angatbasin.wordpress.com/); First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and a project on gender and water pricing in Canada (both funded through SSHRC’s Water Economics, Policy, and Governance Network and described on the website of the Program on Water Governance,www.watergovernance.ca ). A current paper project also considers gender, race, and class in relation to discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.  Prospective graduate students should refer to the website for my ‘lab’: Environment and Development: Gender, Equity and Sustainability Perspectives, www.edges.ubc.ca for more information on my work and that of my students.


Teaching


Research

Research

SSHRC Insight, “Experiences of Shifting Water Governance: Comparative Study of Water Access, Narrative, and Citizenship in Accra Ghana and Cape Town South Africa.” 2013-2016.
http://edges.sites.olt.ubc.ca/research/edges-comparative-water-governance-in-africa-research-project-cwgar/

Res’Eau, NSERC Grant, 2013-2018. Water Governance in BC small communities and First Nations, http://www.reseauwaternet.ca/

SSHRC Connection, Angat Basin (Philippines) Water Governance Project, 2012-2016.https://watergovernance.ca/projects/water-development/urbanizing-watersheds-angat-river/

SSHRC Connection, Water Economics, Policy and Governance Network,
http://www.brocku.ca/social-sciences/research/water-economics-policy-governance-network

SSHRC WEPGN, project on water governance and BC First Nations,
https://watergovernance.ca/projects/water-in-canada/water-quality-in-bc-first-nations-communities/


Publications

Selected Publications

Journal articles and editorials

Harris, L. (2020) Assessing States and Evaluating Publics: Perspectives on water service delivery and evolving state-society relations in Accra, Ghana and Cape Town, South Africa, Environment and Planning C 38: 2: 290-311 https://doi.org/10.1177/2399654419859365

Brisbois, B. W., Spiegel, J. M., & Harris, L.M. (2019). Health, environment and colonial legacies: Situating the science of pesticides, bananas and bodies in Ecuador. Social Science & Medicine, 239, 112529 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112529 [S, LH as 20% contributor]

Hommes, L., Boelens, R., Harris, L.M. and Gert Jan Veldwisch. (2019). Rural–urban water struggles: urbanizing hydrosocial territories and evolving connections, discourses and identities. Water International 44(2): 81-94. https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1583311 [LH as 25% contributor]

Hommes, L., Veldwisch, G.J., Harris, L.M. and Rutgerd Boelens. (2019). Evolving connections, discourses and identities in rural–urban water struggles, Water International 44(2): 243-253. [LH as 20% contributor] https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1583312

Torio, P.C., Harris, L.M. and Leonora C. Angeles. (2019). The rural–urban equity nexus of Metro Manila’s water system. Water International 44(2): 115-128. https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1560559 [S, LH as 20% contributor]

Campero, C., Harris, L.M (2019). The Legal Geographies of Water Claims: Seawater desalination in mining regions of Chile. Water 11 http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/w11050886 [PD, LH as 20 % contributor]

 

Books and edited collections

Harris, L., J. Goldin, C. Sneddon, eds. 2013. Contemporary Water Governance in the Global South: Scarcity, marketization, and participation. Edited Book.

 

Book chapters

Jepson, W., A. Wutich, L. Harris (2020). Water-Security Capabilities and the Human Right to Water. In F. Sultana and A. Loftus (eds) Human Right to Water: Politics, Struggles Routledge, Earthscan. (LH as 33% contributor)

Harris, L. (2020). Equity and Justice: water access in underserved areas of Accra Ghana. Access to Water in Africa: Towards New Paradigms Vulnerabilities, Exclusions, Resilience and New Solidarity. D. Blanchon and B. Casciarri Paris, France, University of Nanterre Press.

Harris, L. (2019). Equity and Justice: water access in underserved areas of Accra Ghana. Access to Water in Africa:
Towards New Paradigms Vulnerabilities, Exclusions, Resilience and New Solidarity. D. Blanchon and B. Casciarri Paris,
France, University of Nanterre Press.

 

Please refer to my IRES website for full list of publications and abstracts.


Additional Description

EDGES Research Collaborativehttp://www.edges.ubc.ca/

Dr. Leila Harris is most interested in gender, inequality and justice in relation to environment and development (from a feminist political ecology perspective), as well as intersections of gender, citizenship, narrative and state building. Projects include: state-led developmental and environmental change in Turkey (with focus on gender and ethnicity); everyday water access, narrative and and citizenship in Ghana and South Africa, First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.


Leila Harris

Professor
About keyboard_arrow_down

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Geography with minor in Development Studies and Social Change, 2004, PhD

Biography

I am most interested in gender, inequality and justice in relation to environment and development (from a feminist political ecology perspective), as well as intersections of gender, citizenship, narrative and state building. Projects include: state-led developmental and environmental change in Turkey (with focus on gender and ethnicity); everyday water access, narrative and citizenship in Ghana and South Africa, First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.

Trained as a socio-cultural and political geographer, my work examines social, cultural and political-economic dimensions of environmental and resource issues, with focus on water politics and governance in developing contexts. My work has highlighted water politics, use, and access in the Middle East, particularly associated with large-scale transformations of the upper Tigris-Euphrates basin. This work has included a range of issues linked with Turkey’s GAP project, from gender and ethnic inequalities, to narratives of nature and state building in the Kurdish dominated southeastern region. Current research efforts include a comparative project on shifting scales and sites of water governance in urban sites of Cape Town, South Africa, and Accra, Ghana, with focus on themes of citizenship, narrative, and inequality. Another project involves analysis of socio-spatial difference and narrative as key dimensions of environmental politics and citizenship in contemporary Turkey (connecting expressions of environmental issues to broader debates related to postcolonialism, affect, green citizenship, and subjectivity). I am also participating in several large collaborative research projects, including:  the use of metagenomic technology for water quality testing (www.watergovernance.ca); water governance in the Angat basin in the Philippines (http://www.angatbasin.wordpress.com/); First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and a project on gender and water pricing in Canada (both funded through SSHRC’s Water Economics, Policy, and Governance Network and described on the website of the Program on Water Governance,www.watergovernance.ca ). A current paper project also considers gender, race, and class in relation to discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.  Prospective graduate students should refer to the website for my ‘lab’: Environment and Development: Gender, Equity and Sustainability Perspectives, www.edges.ubc.ca for more information on my work and that of my students.

Teaching keyboard_arrow_down
Research keyboard_arrow_down

Research

SSHRC Insight, “Experiences of Shifting Water Governance: Comparative Study of Water Access, Narrative, and Citizenship in Accra Ghana and Cape Town South Africa.” 2013-2016.
http://edges.sites.olt.ubc.ca/research/edges-comparative-water-governance-in-africa-research-project-cwgar/

Res’Eau, NSERC Grant, 2013-2018. Water Governance in BC small communities and First Nations, http://www.reseauwaternet.ca/

SSHRC Connection, Angat Basin (Philippines) Water Governance Project, 2012-2016.https://watergovernance.ca/projects/water-development/urbanizing-watersheds-angat-river/

SSHRC Connection, Water Economics, Policy and Governance Network,
http://www.brocku.ca/social-sciences/research/water-economics-policy-governance-network

SSHRC WEPGN, project on water governance and BC First Nations,
https://watergovernance.ca/projects/water-in-canada/water-quality-in-bc-first-nations-communities/

Publications keyboard_arrow_down

Selected Publications

Journal articles and editorials

Harris, L. (2020) Assessing States and Evaluating Publics: Perspectives on water service delivery and evolving state-society relations in Accra, Ghana and Cape Town, South Africa, Environment and Planning C 38: 2: 290-311 https://doi.org/10.1177/2399654419859365

Brisbois, B. W., Spiegel, J. M., & Harris, L.M. (2019). Health, environment and colonial legacies: Situating the science of pesticides, bananas and bodies in Ecuador. Social Science & Medicine, 239, 112529 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112529 [S, LH as 20% contributor]

Hommes, L., Boelens, R., Harris, L.M. and Gert Jan Veldwisch. (2019). Rural–urban water struggles: urbanizing hydrosocial territories and evolving connections, discourses and identities. Water International 44(2): 81-94. https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1583311 [LH as 25% contributor]

Hommes, L., Veldwisch, G.J., Harris, L.M. and Rutgerd Boelens. (2019). Evolving connections, discourses and identities in rural–urban water struggles, Water International 44(2): 243-253. [LH as 20% contributor] https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1583312

Torio, P.C., Harris, L.M. and Leonora C. Angeles. (2019). The rural–urban equity nexus of Metro Manila’s water system. Water International 44(2): 115-128. https://doi.org/10.1080/02508060.2019.1560559 [S, LH as 20% contributor]

Campero, C., Harris, L.M (2019). The Legal Geographies of Water Claims: Seawater desalination in mining regions of Chile. Water 11 http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/w11050886 [PD, LH as 20 % contributor]

 

Books and edited collections

Harris, L., J. Goldin, C. Sneddon, eds. 2013. Contemporary Water Governance in the Global South: Scarcity, marketization, and participation. Edited Book.

 

Book chapters

Jepson, W., A. Wutich, L. Harris (2020). Water-Security Capabilities and the Human Right to Water. In F. Sultana and A. Loftus (eds) Human Right to Water: Politics, Struggles Routledge, Earthscan. (LH as 33% contributor)

Harris, L. (2020). Equity and Justice: water access in underserved areas of Accra Ghana. Access to Water in Africa: Towards New Paradigms Vulnerabilities, Exclusions, Resilience and New Solidarity. D. Blanchon and B. Casciarri Paris, France, University of Nanterre Press.

Harris, L. (2019). Equity and Justice: water access in underserved areas of Accra Ghana. Access to Water in Africa:
Towards New Paradigms Vulnerabilities, Exclusions, Resilience and New Solidarity. D. Blanchon and B. Casciarri Paris,
France, University of Nanterre Press.

 

Please refer to my IRES website for full list of publications and abstracts.

Additional Description keyboard_arrow_down

EDGES Research Collaborativehttp://www.edges.ubc.ca/

Dr. Leila Harris is most interested in gender, inequality and justice in relation to environment and development (from a feminist political ecology perspective), as well as intersections of gender, citizenship, narrative and state building. Projects include: state-led developmental and environmental change in Turkey (with focus on gender and ethnicity); everyday water access, narrative and and citizenship in Ghana and South Africa, First Nations water governance in British Columbia; and discourses of reproduction in North American green politics.