Critical Studies in Sexuality


Co-Chair, Critical Studies in Sexuality
Chair, Undergraduate Program and Undergraduate Advisor, Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice
Senior Instructor, Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice

In addition to CSIS, Dr. Janice Stewart teaches in English Department and in the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice. Her major fields of research are British Modernism and Critical Theory. She is currently working on a series of articles dealing with issues of sexuality, including Contagion theory, Censorship and Homosexual Panic in the trial of Radclyffe Hall; Locked in a Room of One’s Own; Querying the Quest for keys to Woolf’s Madness; Shadows in a Cracked Mirror The Spectre in The Well of Loneliness; and Totemic Subjects: Cultural Appropriations and Identificatory Practices in Emily Carr’s “Indian Stories.

Dr. Mary K. Bryson is Senior Associate Dean, Administration, Faculty Affairs & Innovation and Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia (ubc.academia.edu/MaryKBryson). Dr. Bryson is the author of multiple publications concerning the social, cultural and educational significance of networked media technologies and publics that make significant contributions to theoretical accounts of gendered and sexual marginality, knowledge mobilization and resilience. Dr. Bryson chairs the UBC Vice-Presidential Trans, Two-Spirit and Gender Diversity Task Force and is a member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) Global Education Initiative.

Instructor I, Critical Race and Ethnic Studies, Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice

Dr. JP Catungal is Instructor I (Tenure-Track) in Critical Race and Ethnic Studies in the GRSJ Institute. His teaching interests include anti-racist feminisms, queer-of-colour critique, the politics of knowledge production, and migration and diaspora studies. JP’s research develops queer-of-colour and anti-racist feminist interventions in the scholarship of teaching and learning. He is also engaged in ongoing work on racial geographies of sexual health, alignments between homonationalism and straight allyship, and queer-of-colour theorizing in Filipinx-Canadian studies.

Assistant Professor, Germanic Studies in Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies

Dr. Kyle Frackman’s teaching and research lie primarily in German studies, Scandinavian studies, and film studies.

Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
Faculty Affiliate, Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies

Dr. Amin Ghaziani is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia. He received his Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern in 2006. Before joining the faculty at UBC, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Princeton Society of Fellows. Ghaziani is a sociologist of sexualities with additional interests in culture, social movements, and cities.

Professor and Head, Department of English

Dr. Stephen Guy-Bray is Professor and Head of the Department of English. He specializes in Renaissance poetry and queer theory. He is the author of three monographs (most recently, Against Reproduction: Where Renaissance Texts Come From) and the co-editor of two collections of essays. Forthcoming are an edition of Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II and an essay on angel sex. He is currently working on a study of queer paraphrase.

First Nations Studies Chair
Professor, Department of English and First Nations Studies
Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture

Daniel Heath Justice is a Colorado-born Canadian citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Dr. Justice’s research and creative writing focus on indigenous literary studies, a field that seeks to document the aesthetic, social, historical, and intellectual contexts of indigenous North American literatures. He has also documented animal cultural histories, such as that of the badger, and the ways in which myths, legends, and spiritual beliefs about specific animals inspire representation, religion, and arts throughout human history.

Professor, Department of Sociology
Sociology Undergraduate Studies Committee Chair

Dr. Thomas Kemple is Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses on the rhetorical, literary and deconstructive dimensions of classical sociological texts and contemporary cultural theory.

Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

Dr. Loutzenheizer’s research interests are focused on the educational experiences of marginalized youth. This focus emanates from her teaching experience and research on youth in alternative educational settings. She combines a fascination with curriculum, queer /gender, and poststructural theories, as well as the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, etc. in schooling to look at the experiences of marginalized youth.

Dr. Lori MacIntosh received her Ph.D. in the Sociology of Education in 2013. She has been teaching in the Faculty of Education since 2009, and in Critical Studies in Sexuality since 2011. Lori also serves as an academic advisor in UBC’s Doctor, Patient and Society (DPAS) Undergraduate Medical Program. Her research interests include critical studies in gender and sexuality, queer theory, youth media studies, and the intersecting realms of social justice theory.

Assistant Professor, Department of English

Dr. Gregory Mackie is Assistant Professor in the Department of English. He has published several articles on Oscar Wilde, and is currently at work on a book project on Wilde and literary forgery. His research interests include aestheticism and decadence, queer drama and book history.

Associate Professor, Department of English

Dr. Vin Nardizzi teaches Renaissance literature, ecocriticism, and queer and disability studies. His book, Wooden Os: Shakespeare’s Theatres and England’s Trees (University of Toronto Press, 2013), brings into view the forest and the trees of Renaissance drama: it explores the surprising connections among Shakespeare’s theatre, drama set “in the woods,” and an environmental crisis that propagandists claimed would to lead to an eco-political collapse – an unprecedented scarcity of wood and timber. His next project, Vaster Than Empires: The Lives of Early Modern Vegetables, investigates the surprising array of vegetable capacities, deprivations, desires, essences, and materialities that shaped ideas of humanness in Renaissance letters and the visual arts. With Stephen Guy-Bray and Will Stockton, he has edited Queer Renaissance Historiography: Backward Gaze(Ashgate, 2009), and with Jean E. Feerick has co-edited The Indistinct Human in Renaissance Literature (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). He received a Killam Teaching Prize in 2011

Co-Chair, Critical Studies in Sexuality
Assistant Professor, Department of English

Judith Paltin is an assistant professor in UBC’s Department of English, where she researches queer, minor and collectivist performances at the intersection of literary, social and cultural theory. Her current projects focus on the crowds of British and Irish modernism and on modern and contemporary theories of collective identification, radical forms of democracy, and action. She also has interests in global modernisms, literature and music, minority cultures and subcultures, environmental humanities, and critical university studies.

Professor & Distinguished University Scholar, Department of Philosophy

Alan Richardson works on the relations of history of philosophy and history of science in the era since Kant. He specializes in the history of philosophy of science in the early twentieth century, and uses resources from science and technology studies (STS) to illuminate the history of logical positivist “scientific philosophy” and its lingering effects on the research organization of academic philosophy to the present day.

Professor, Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice

Since 1995, Dr. Becki Ross has held a joint appointment in the Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice and the Department of Sociology. She teaches and researches in the areas of the history of sexuality, ‘the family’, gender/queer relations, qualitative methods, anti-racist studies, and critical sport studies. Becki is the recipient of two teaching awards (2005 & 2008. She will serve as the Harry Lyman Hooker Fellow at McMaster University in September 2013.

Associate Professor, Department of Educational Studies
Scholar, Centre for Health Education Scholarship
Graduate Advisor, Department of Educational Studies

Dr. Claudia Ruitenberg is a philosopher of education with a particular interest in poststructuralist philosophy (Derrida, Butler) and radical democratic theory (Rancière, Mouffe). Her research interests include the ethics of hospitality in education, discursive performativity, agonistic political theory and political education, aesthetic education and theory, epistemological diversity in educational research, and philosophy of health professions education. She teaches educational theory, philosophical methods, and critical social theory.

Co-Chair, Critical Studies in Sexuality
Chair, Undergraduate Program and Undergraduate Advisor, Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice
Senior Instructor, Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice

In addition to CSIS, Dr. Janice Stewart teaches in English Department and in the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice. Her major fields of research are British Modernism and Critical Theory. She is currently working on a series of articles dealing with issues of sexuality, including Contagion theory, Censorship and Homosexual Panic in the trial of Radclyffe Hall; Locked in a Room of One’s Own; Querying the Quest for keys to Woolf’s Madness; Shadows in a Cracked Mirror The Spectre in The Well of Loneliness; and Totemic Subjects: Cultural Appropriations and Identificatory Practices in Emily Carr’s “Indian Stories.

Director, Graduate Programs and Graduate Advisor, Critical Curatorial Studies
Professor and Head, Art History, Visual Art and Theory
Director/Curator, Morris and Helen Belkin art Gallery

Dr. Scott Watson is Director/Curator of the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery (1989- ) and Professor in the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory (2003- ). He is Director and Graduate Advisor for the Critical Curatorial Studies program, which he helped initiate in September 2002, and serves on numerous University committees, including the President’s Advisory Committee on University Art and the Ad-hoc Committee on Lesbian and Gay Issues. He also sits on numerous external boards and committees, including the Vancouver Institute for the Visual Arts. Recent distinctions include the UBC Dorothy Sommerset Award for Performance Development in the Visual and Performing Arts, March 2005. The Avlin Balkind Award for Creative Curating. 2008 and the Hnatyshin Award for Curatorial excellence in 2011.

Professor and Director, Director of Centre for Culture, Identity & Education, Department of Educational Studies

Handel Kashope Wright is a Professor in the Department of Educational Studies and Director of the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education. His work focuses on continental and diasporic African cultural studies, critical multiculturalism, anti-racist education, qualitative research, and curriculum theorizing. Dr. Wrights’ current research examines postmulticulturalsim, youth identity, and belonging in the Canadian context.

Professor & Distinguished University Scholar, Measurement, Evaluation, & Research Methodology Program, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, Faculty of Education

Dr. Bruno Zumbo is a a measurement theorist, statistician, and applied mathematician. His research and professional interests focus on developing statistical theory and quantitative methods for conducting research, testing, and evaluation. Dr. Zumbo’s research program focuses on theoretical and applied psychometrics and statistical science, and on measurement, program evaluation, and methodological issues in quality of life, subjective well-being, and social science research. His worked has influenced language testing, psychometrics, validity theory, and educational and behavioural statistics.