Graduate Courses

The following are the 2017/18 graduate courses offered at the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice. Scroll down for course descriptions.

Winter 2017

GRSJ500 Intersectional Issues in Social Justice and Equality Studies Sections

GRSJ501 Issues in Decolonizing and Feminist Methodologies Sections

GRSJ502 Issues in Gender, Sexuality, and Critical Race Theories Sections

GRSJ503E Special Topics in Feminist Studies - TPC FEMNST STDYS Sections

GRSJ504A Decolonizing Praxis for Social Justice and Equality Studies: A Practicum - DECOL PRX PRACTM Sections

GRSJ505A Directed Reading in Advanced Feminist Studies - DIR READ FEMNST Sections

GRSJ505B Directed Reading in Advanced Feminist Studies - DIR READ FEMNST Sections

GRSJ505C Directed Reading in Advanced Feminist Studies - DIR READ FEMNST Sections

GRSJ510 Extended Essay Sections

GRSJ520B M.A. Thesis - M.A. THESIS Sections

Pass/Fail.

GRSJ606 Doctoral Dissertation Sections

Pass/Fail.

   
GRSJ 500

GRSJ 500 (3): Intersectional Issues in Social Justice and Equality Studies
Term 1-2

A two-term seminar organized around the bi-weekly Wednesday Lecture Series, readings, discussions and faculty seminars.

Required for first year MA and PhD students.

Instructor: Dr. Dina Al-Kassim
GRSJ 501

GRSJ 501 (3): Issues in Decolonizing and Feminist Methodologies
Term 2

This course aims to stimulate discussion around decolonizing feminist social research methodologies by examining alternative (research) practices in the social sciences, humanities and applied fields (e.g. planning, education, environment and natural resources, health, social work, etc.) that lead towards respectful, reciprocal and responsible dialogues in (re)producing and (re)generating knowledge and action. Learners will be tackling issues in decolonizing and feminist research methodologies by questioning as well as redressing common disciplinary, cisnormative and heteronormative assumptions around knowledge, knowledge production and distribution -- examining whose knowledge and what forms of knowledge bases matter, how these knowledge bases are acquired and disseminated as we search for more complex, nuanced, and diverse ways of dealing with research problems/issues, ethics and methods from feminist, anti-colonial and indigenous perspectives.

Required for first year MA and PhD students.

Instructor: Dr. Leonora Angeles
GRSJ 502

GRSJ 502 (3): Issues in Gender, Sexuality and Critical Race Theories
Term 1

Introduces students to key issues at the intersection of Queer, Trans, Feminist and Critical Race Theories. We will examine a variety of cultural texts (eg, fiction, film) and new models of academic and cultural engagement with a radical democratic politics. Required for first year MA and PhD students.

Instructor: Dr. Denise Ferreira da Silva
GRSJ 503E

GRSJ 503E (3): Special Topics in Feminist Studies: Black and Indigenous Writings across the Americas
Term 1

Over the past two decades, the generative political and intellectual frameworks for the analysis of racial capitalism (Cedric Robinson; Angela Davis; Robin Kelley) on the one hand and settler colonialism (Nira Yuval-Davis and Daiva K Stasiulis; Jodi Byrd; Patrick Wolfe) on the other have risen to prominence, but have rarely been put directly in dialogue. “Racial capitalism” clarifies the ways in which anti-Black racism has been a fundamental, not incidental, component to economic development and underdevelopment in the Atlantic world and beyond while “settler colonialism” brings into focus the logic of dispossession and replacement that organizes this particular form of invasion and habitation on Indigenous lands. Both interpretive schemas can help us think through the genealogies and discontinuities of slavery, settlement, and Indigenous dispossession.

By focusing on Indigenous and Black writings across the Americas (particularly those from Brazil, Canada, Guyana, and USA), this seminar will bring these critical fields into more fruitful conversation, and will grapple with why they often seem to be deployed separately to explain the legacies of gendered, racialized, and state sanctioned violence across the Americas. We will work with the tantalizingly plural keyword “Americas” as a way to plot the traces of transnational and transcultural migration and displacements throughout the hemisphere. We will interrogate historical experiences of labor and production organized around the axis of capital and the world market (Quijano 2000), experiences that include slavery, genocide, serfdom, petty commodity production, reciprocity, and violent intimacies, at the same time that we explore the possibilities of hidden or potential solidarities, revolts, passions and generative intimacies.

Instructor: Dr. Phanuel Antwi
GRSJ 504A

GRSJ 504A (3): Decolonizing Praxis for Social Justice and Equality Studies: A Practicum
Term 2

Students will draw on theoretical knowledge acquired in GRSJ studies to participate in a diverse range of community organizations working towards socio-political, economic and cultural transformation. As is the case with all UBC practice-related courses, this course requires a Criminal Record Check.

Note: this course is cross-listed with GRSJ 480

Instructor: Dr. Kim Snowden


GRSJ 505A (3): Directed Reading
Sec 002, Term 1
Sec 003, Term 2


Undertaken with the supervision of a faculty member selected by the student, with the approval of the GRSJ Graduate Chair. For form/instructions contact e-mail the GRSJ Office or phone 604-822-9171. Restricted to students in GRSJ graduate programs.

GRSJ 505B (6): Directed Reading
Sec 001, Term 1-2


Undertaken with the supervision of a faculty member selected by the student, with the approval of the GRSJ Graduate Chair. For form/instructions contact e-mail the GRSJ Office or phone 604-822-9171. Restricted to students in GRSJ graduate programs.

GRSJ 510 (3): Extended Essay


Non-thesis option for student enrolled in the GRSJ Master of Arts program.

GRSJ 520B (9): MA thesis


GRSJ 606 (0): PhD Thesis