Placing Angola: Race, coloniality and human-animal encounters at the Louisiana State Penitentiary

Ecologies of Social Difference and the Social Justice Institute present:

Dr. Katie Gillespie
Placing Angola: Race, coloniality and human-animal encounters at the Louisiana State Penitentiary

Mar 3, 11am – 12pm
Room 028, Jack Bell Building
2080 West Mall

RSVP

The Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola is a site embedded with historical U.S. legacies of plantation slavery, colonization, labor and hierarchies of power. This talk explores the multispecies entanglements at Angola and their colonial histories which shape present social relations in the merging of the Western and Southern United States. Drawing on preliminary fieldwork conducted at the Angola Rodeo, this talk explores how we might better understand the racialized and multispecies dimensions of incarceration and captivity by considering a historically-contextualized analysis of the politics of place in the present.

Kathryn (Katie) Gillespie earned her PhD in Geography at the University of Washington. Her current research on plantation economies, coloniality, and carceral geographies of Louisiana draws together black feminist geographies, postcolonial theory, and critical animal studies. The book based on her dissertation research on the gendered commodification of the animal body in U.S. dairy production – The Cow with Ear Tag #1389 – is under contract with the University of Chicago Press (expected publication, fall 2016).


This event is co-sponsored by Ecologies of Social Difference, as part of the Social Justice Institute’s Thematic Research Networks.