Dr. Martin Manalansan – FABULOSITY: MESSY NARRATIVES OF QUEER PATHOS AND EXUBERANCE

Social Justice Institute presents:

NOTED SCHOLARS LECTURE SERIES

Dr. Martin Manalansan
FABULOSITY: MESSY NARRATIVES OF QUEER PATHOS AND EXUBERANCE

Oct 21, 12-1pm
Green College UBC
Coach House, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road

RSVP

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP’s are not required to attend, only encouraged.
Lunch will be provided!

 

ABSTRACT: This talk is part of a longer study of queer dwelling and mess and is an investigation of stories, moments, gestures, images and atmospheres of the “fabulous” set against sites and lives of desperation, suffering, and precarity. Focusing on the lives of six working class undocumented queer immigrants of color living in a small household in New York City, this presentation limns the infra-ordinary performances of exuberance as these frictively glide through the grit and grime of economic, political and cultural struggles of working class queers who are unable to attain social recognition and citizenship in a burgeoning mainstreaming LGBT community. This work is a meditation on persistent issues and tensions in queer studies: complicity vs. resistance; normativity vs. antinormativity; death vs. aliveness; suffering vs. happiness.

 

martinmanalansanMartin F. Manalansan IV is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Asian American Studies and a Conrad Professorial Humanities Scholar at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.  He is an affiliate faculty in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, the Global Studies Program and the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory.   He is the author of Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (Duke University Press, 2003; Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2006) which was awarded the Ruth Benedict Prize in 2003. He is editor/co-editor of three anthologies namely, Cultural Compass: Ethnographic Explorations of Asian America (Temple University Press, 2000) and Queer Globalizations: Citizenship and the Afterlife of Colonialism (New York University Press, 2002), Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader (New York University Press, 2013) as well as a special issue of International Migration Review on gender and migration. His current book projects include the ethical and embodied dimensions of the lives and struggles of undocumented queer immigrants, Asian American immigrant culinary cultures, sensory and affective dimensions of race and difference, and Filipino return migration.